Have Your Wedding Cake—and eat it too!

Oct 11, 2018 Posted in Wedding No Comment

Give your cake it’s moment in the spotlight with these beautiful decorative trends for 2018.

Weddings and delicious food have always gone hand and hand. This is likely because the act of enjoying a meal brings people together, and helps encourage celebration. When it comes to tying the knot, though, there’s one food item that’s been a staple longer than most: some sort of cake.

A SLICE OF HISTORY

Cakes have played a huge part at wedding receptions for decades. According to the Food Network, this tradition actually dates back to ancient Rome, when weddings always ended with a symbolic act: the groom would break a loaf of barley bread over his bride’s head—(hopefully he was careful of her up-do)—and this was said to symbolize fertility. Wedding guests would go running to pick up any fallen pieces and even crumbs, hoping to take home just a bit of the good luck.

In medieval England, another type of bread was used. Small, round spiced buns were formed into a large tower. The newlyweds were tasked with sharing a kiss over the top of the pile. If they successfully kissed without making the rolls tumble, it was believed that they were destined to enjoy a lifetime of happiness and prosperity throughout their marriage.

SWEET AS PIE

It hasn’t always been all about cake, however. Wedding treats of various kinds have been tied to superstitions for as long as we can remember. It was first pies that filled wedding celebrations. The Food Network noted that the first pie recipe ever recorded was specifically for a wedding and was called “Bride’s Pye.” The recipe was listed in a 1685 edition of a book called The Accomplisht Cook. It calls for a large and elaborately decorated pie filled with a variety of delicious meats, offal and seasonings. It was sometimes tradition to hide rings inside of these pies—not the bride and groom’s rings, but a lucky ring for an unsuspecting woman to find. Superstition said that the woman whose pie slice contained the ring would be the next to be married. If you’re a pie lover whose looking to bring back this savory tradition, check out these expertly decorated pies.

A DECADENT COMEBACK

Over time, wedding cakes greatly surpassed pies in popularity. Sugar was becoming more readily available throughout Britain in the mid-16th century, and white sugar was the most admired. It became a sign of privilege to offer cakes containing white sugar—which had undergone a refinement process and was more costly. Purely white icing on wedding cakes came to symbolize not only the purity of bride and the union but as a status symbol of sorts. Famous queens continued this tradition over the years, expanding on this tradition and creating the term “royal icing,” which is still in use today.

THE ICING ON THE CAKE

Yesterday we celebrated National Cake Decorating Day, and it had us thinking about these fancy confections and current trends surrounding them. If you’re getting married and considering serving cake at the reception, you are guaranteed to be met with hundreds of options. From flavors of the cake and frosting to decorative elements, there’s so much to choose from. According to The Knot, some of the latest and greatest cake trends of 2018 include:

  • Metallics
  • “Naked” layers
  • Sugar ruffles
  • White on white design
  • Forest / woodland elements
  • Painted and illustrated designs
  • Lace overlay
  • Geometric patterns
  • Sugarflower groupings
  • All-over rosette designs
  • Ombre layers
  • Monograms
  • All buttercream
  • Trio and quintet cake tables

Whatever your cake, pie or reception dessert selection, it should pay tribute to you and your significant other. Finding a way to tie it to your own interests and likes helps keep the day special, and all about you as a couple. If you’d like to talk confections, we’re game any time. Browse our sample wedding menus to gather ideas, and give us a call to discuss your favorite styles and flavors. We’ll see what we can whip up!

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